Oxylabs Cuts Prices, Introduces a Pay-As-You-Go Plan

The premium provider takes further steps towards opening up to smaller clients.

Lithuanian proxy provider Oxylabs has revamped the pricing of its residential proxy service. The change comprises two parts: 

1) Introduction of a new pay-as-you-go plan

2) Adjustments to existing subscription-based plans

New Pay-As-You-Go Plan

The new plan allows Oxylabs’ customers to use residential proxies at a fixed rate of $15 per gigabyte. The traffic never expires, and it doesn’t require entering into a monthly subscription. This means you can get as little as 1 GB for a minor task and still find it half a year later. 

The traffic bought this way caps at 50 GBs per month. Once a month passes, the limit resets, and it becomes possible to get more. That said, at this scale it may make more financial sense to simply grab a monthly plan. 

Price Cuts for Old Plans

The introduction of pay-as-you-go has also impacted Oxylabs’ subscription-based plans – two of them have become cheaper. For the same price, you’ll get 5 and 10 GBs more, respectively. The third plan, Corporate, hasn’t changed in price, but you can now buy it through self-service. 

PlanOld priceNew priceDifference
Starter ($300)$15/GB$12/GB+5 GB
Business ($600)$12/GB$10/GB+10 GB
Corporate ($900)$9/GB$9/GBNo difference

Implications

This is Oxylabs’ second move to unlock the lower segments of the market this year. The first introduced affordable rotating datacenter proxies.

While they’re unlikely to impact the most price-conscious customers, the changes go a long way toward making Oxylabs more approachable for quality-seeking users with small needs. This was an area where the provider seriously struggled behind its main adversary Bright Data. 

For example, sneakerheads will now have the option to approach the provider directly rather than going through specialized resellers that impose extra overhead. 

In addition, the price cuts will make Oxylabs more competitive among premium providers, some of which haven’t adjusted their prices – or have even increased them – in recent years.

Adam is a co-founder of Proxyway. He spends way too much time researching and writing about proxies.

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